State of Innovation

Patents and Innovation Economics

What Your Position on Patents Reveals About You

It is surprising how much your position on patents reveals about your philosophical premises.  We need to first understand five fundamental facts about patents.

 

  1. The wealthiest countries in the world have the strongest patent systems.

This fact should be readily apparent to anyone who has looked into this subject.  There have been a number of studies on point and the correlation is at least as strong as the economic freedom index.

 

  1. Almost all new technologies are developed by the countries with the strongest patent systems.

This fact should be readily apparent to anyone who has looked into this subject.  This obvious fact has been verified by studies.

 

  1. The Industrial Revolution started in the countries (Great Britain and the US) that had the first functioning patent systems.[1]

Again this fact should apparent to anyone who has looked into this subject.

 

  1. Ayn Rand called patents (and copyrights) the most fundamental of all property rights.aynrandstamp

 

  1. Patents are enshrined in the US Constitution, Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8.

Patents and copyrights are the only rights mentioned in the original Constitution.  Note the Bill of Rights was not part of the original Constitution.[2]

 

Conclusions

Here are some straight forward conclusions we can draw from these facts.

 

  1. When a person is against patent rights for inventors, they are not an Objectivist, they are a poser.

 

  1. When someone argues that patents inhibit economic growth, they have an almost insurmountable burden of proof to overcome.

 

  1. When someone argues that patents retard the growth of new technologies, their position is not just wrong, it shows the person is irrational.

 

  1. When a person is against patents they are not pro-Constitution (a supporter of the Constitution), they are a poser.

Many libertarians and Austrians want to act like they support the US Constitution, but attack the property rights of inventors (patents).  You cannot have it both ways.

 

Here are some other conclusions that we can draw that are not quite as straight forward.

 

  1. People who attack patents have rejected Natural Rights.

Patents are built on Natural Rights (as is the founding of the US).  Under Natural Rights theory anyone who creates something has a property right in their creation.  Note that the libertarians and Austrians (economics) who argue against patents have all rejected Natural Rights and adopted Utilitarianism as their political ethics.  The socialists who argue against patents have adopted Altruism as their political ethics.

 

  1. People who attack patents believe reason is limited.

The Libertarians that attack patents are all enthralled with the philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, like Hume, Mill, Burke[3], and Hayek[4].  David Hume was an extreme skeptic that said humans could not even show we existed.  Hume argued that cause and effect did not exist.  He also argued induction and therefore science were nonsense.  He attacked Natural Rights and argued that a rational ethics was impossible.  (Hume supporters will argue he was just skeptical of these things, but the ferocity with which he attacks them shows that this was not just an interesting academic exercise on the part of Hume).  All of these philosophers undermine reason.  Many like Kant say they are for reason, but reason is limited.  That is a contradiction, but beyond this post.  Of course it is clear that the socialists also have rejected reason.

 

 

 

[1] The first patent system was Venice in the 1400s and Venice was one of the wealthiest and most technologically advanced cities in the world at the time.

[2] The Writ of Habeas Corpus is not a Right, it is a procedural guarantee.

[3] Burke is sometime considered part of the Scottish Enlightenment and sometimes not.  In this case he should be included.

[4] Intellectually Hayek fits the Scottish Enlightenment to a tee even though he is not normally included in this group.

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September 16, 2016 - Posted by | -Economics, News, Patents | , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. Patents are important but there have been problems with the Patent Office issuing patents on concepts and loose ideas, like giving Microsoft a patent on putting a box around a number, and problems with patent trolls buying patents to collect money and prevent people from developing ideas without producing any products or innovations in the marketplace. If we can solve those problems, calls to eliminate patents will fade.

    Comment by MMays | September 23, 2016 | Reply

    • While I may agree with you general points, you do not know how to read claims so your specific input is nonsense.

      Comment by dbhalling | September 23, 2016 | Reply

  2. The OP is a bit confused. The question is not patents or no patents but what types of patents are reasonable, for how long a term and with what kinds of enforcement.

    Comment by Samantha Atkins | September 25, 2016 | Reply


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